Bi Representation at Pride

What is now referred to as the first pride march was organised by an openly bi activist, Brenda Howard.
She was known as ‘The Mother of Pride’ and she organised a rally for the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which started the tradition of pride marches and celebrations that we know today.

So why do so many bi+ people today feel like that they are not welcome at pride, or that they only belong if they’re in a same-gender relationship?
It’s time to change all that, and with a record number of pride events in Scotland this year, it’s never been easier to be a part of pride!

Depending on where you live, pride might be the only time of year that you knowingly get to spend time with the LGBTQIA+ community. It can be a positive and validating experience to be surrounded by people who understand the struggles that we face.
This is why it is so important that bi+ people are made to feel welcome at pride, and one of the easiest ways to do that is to have a visible bi+ presence at pride events.

We will be publicising pre-march meeting points for pride events where we are present, and where we know of local bi+ groups who are marching. Keep an eye on our social media to see when and where people are meeting before your local pride.
Even if you are the only bi+ person in your area (that you know of), it doesn’t mean you have to go to pride alone. Encourage friends and family to march with you in solidarity, and you might meet other bi+ people who thought that they were alone too!

Visibility is key, and it’s simple to do. Show up to your local pride with your bi/pan/poly/omni pride flags, and/or wear matching colours.

Wristbands and other jewellery can be a way of showing other bi+ people that you are part of the community without having to be out to the whole world.
Unicorns are often associated with the bi+ community, and can be another stealthy way to show others that you are part of the community.


For those of you that are looking to do more, getting involved in the organising committee for your local pride will help make future events more inclusive by adding a bi+ perspective.
Pride events are usually organised by volunteers, and if there are no bi+ people on the committee, it can be easy for the bi+ community to be overlooked.

And for those of you still unsure if you’re welcome at pride, just remember:
Pride is for the entire LGBTQIA+ community, and our allies.
That includes single bi+ people, those in mixed-gender relationships, and those who are told that they don’t look ‘gay enough’ (newsflash: we’re bi+, not gay, and we come in all shapes, sizes and races).
We’re looking forward to all the pride events this year, and we hope that we’ll see you there!

For details of pride events in Scotland see our events page which includes a calendar with all the information.